Toxic Molds beyond Black Mold

toxic molds that should be included in air quality tests

toxic molds that should be included in air quality tests

When testing buildings for air quality and toxic molds, mold inspectors have focused on Stachybotrys chartarum, or black mold, a toxin-producing fungus. Now, research has shown that it may be important to test for additional fungi from the genus Myrothecium, a toxic mold that is a close relative of Stachybotrys.

Though Myrothecium species are known to cause diseases in plants, Stachybotrys has been linked to serious diseases in livestock and humans, and both toxic molds are known to produce the same kinds of mycotoxins.

All these fungi are common in nature, where they pose no threat to human health. But these toxins can accumulate and become a hazard indoors, especially if a building is relatively airtight (see Mold Problems with R-2000 homes). It is of utmost importance that homeowners of “tight buildings” in particular learn how to control household condensation.